Vlog & FMS | Funny ‘Ish’ People Say If You Have Fibromyalgia (“You Don’t Look Ill”)

Snapshot 1 (25-Jan-15 17-36)

Over the years, I’ve heard a lot of interesting comments about fibromyalgia, whether directed at me or at others. Just for fun, I decided to put together a little video sketch about these experiences.

If you have fibromyalgia, then I hope you will connect with this video and have little laugh about our shared experiences.

If you don’t have fibromyalgia…then one of these character might be you. 😉

Enjoy!

FMS | FibroArt Monday! :)

Image from Rhonda Moss on Pinterest

Image from Rhonda Moss on Pinterest

I came across this great image on Pinterest (pinned by Rhonda Moss).

It is truly fascinating to me that there are some people who do not understand that fibromyalgia is a chronic illness, i.e. lifelong…no end in sight…you have to live with it, etc., etc.

At the same time, it is important that we, who have FMS, do not become overly frustrated with such questions.  In my opinion, they stem from feelings of helplessness.  It is not easy to watch someone close to you (or not) go through such a difficult time.  In this era of information overload and quick-fix, I think that we have come to believe that everything has to have a readily understandable explanation and an easy method of resolution–unfortunately, it is not so simple with FMS.

So, to everyone who asks such a question: No, we’re not better yet.  No, we don’t know when we will be. 🙂

FMS | MyClaimSource: Know Your Rights in Filing Insurance Claims

Image by Randy Glasbergen: http://www.glasbergen.com/

We’ve all been there, in one form or another: waiting for hours on end, listening to crappy elevator music or even being transported back to the 80s when Billy Ocean was a recognizable name, checking and rechecking the policy number on the front of our health insurance cards, and jumping with hope every time there’s that brief moment of silence, thinking that…the wait is over. It never seems to be.

It’s enough just being a person who knows the names of all the people in your local hospital, staff and patients…because you’re there on an almost daily basis, since your doctor can’t figure out your illness. It’s enough being poked, prodded, and loaded up with so many different medications every few weeks…because your doctor or your specialist our your psychiatrist doesn’t think whatever else you’re doing is working and you have to be fixed.

It’s really all enough. Then you find yourself, phone in hand, trying to explain your recent health escapade and why it isn’t your fault that you’re sick, and trying to help the person on the other end do their job and not make your life a living hell by telling you things like…you had a pre-existing condition that doesn’t qualify for medical reimbursement.

Image by Mark Anderson: Found on http://seriousstartups.com/

I’ve spent a lot of time dealing with the claim process, both in the US and in Italy. Heck, I’ve even delegated the task to my poor ex-wife (Hey, April!), because the whole thing just stressed me out…which only made me more and more sick. This is why I was so glad to have heard about MyClaimSource.com, a website devoted to helping any and everyone who has to go through the experience of filing a claim–Thanks, Hannah!

The site offers not just information but advice on how to navigate the sometimes treacherous waters of health insurance companies. Even if you don’t have to deal with filing a claim now, still check it out.

You never know when you might need the knowledge they have to provide.

Below is an excerpt from the site’s main page:

“We founded Myclaimsource.com after several frustrating experiences filing insurance claims. When we needed help and advice on how to file a claim, the information just wasn’t there. Even when the insurance agents were well-intentioned and well-trained, they still didn’t seem to have the practical, “ground level” experience we needed to answer our questions. “Am I eligible to file a claim?” “Is this covered by my policy?” “How do I get start with my claim?” “How long should I expect to wait for an answer?” On this site, we have researched every provider policy we could find to try and answer these key questions for you. We’re also aiming to provide an open forum to connect those looking to file claims with people who already have, and who may be able to offer tips and advice on claim filing with a given provider. We hope that you find this site helpful, and that it can save you time and frustration as you go about the already no-fun task of filing your insurance claim.”

Remember, there is always a new path to be found…you just have to choose to follow it.

Until Next Time,

D.

FMS | PainMaps.com: A New Nerve Pain Resource Site

Image from PainMaps: http://www.painmaps.com/

If you are like me, then living in a world of pain is just part of the package of your existence.  Pain is pain, no matter how it manifests or what it is labeled: Fibromyalgia (FMS), Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFIDS), Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Osteoarthritis, Neuropathic Pain, and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) as well as many others on the ever-growing list of syndromes and disorders.

I know first-hand that living with an invisible illness, which chronic pain of is, can mean being disregarded, misunderstood, or even blatantly being called a liar or crazy or whatever else makes someone else feel better for not being able or knowing how to help. This is one of the reasons why I shifted my blog’s focus to discussing living with FMS, because I understood that there were others going through similar experiences.

We, who are living with pain, need more community as well as resource outlets. This is why I was so glad when I received a message from Jessica Mendes, the founder of PainMaps.com, a resource site dedicated to providing resources for those who experience and those who want to understand chronic pain.

Mendes, who is a ghostwriter and intuitive translator, has been living with CRPS for many years, and began PainMaps as a way of providing outreach with an alternative touch; it’s about allowing ourselves to rethink how see, understand, approach, and care for pain, particularly (but not exclusively) in regards to CRPS, which is also known as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD).  It is a collaborative site that invites contributions for all those who would care to share their experiences and knowledge.

Harkening back to my Boston days, I’d have to say that I am wicked excited about this site, and hope you will be as well.

 Let’s build more community by venturing new paths! Visit PainMaps.com!

Until Next Time,

D.

FMS | Yoga in Bed & ATR Challenge Update!

I have been a seeker and I still am, but I stopped asking the books and the stars. I started listening to the teaching of my Soul. ~ by Rumi 

Today, the yoga mat looks too far away–to be honest, for two days I denied the existence of my mat…What mat?–and I don’t know that I feel like excessive movement is an option for me today, much like yesterday and the day before that.

Still, I am into opposite action, so I unroll the mat.  Like the walls and most everything else in my room, the mat is  pink, a nice loving colour, and I need some unconditional love right about now.

Fun fact: I’ve practiced yoga since the age of 3

I take a moment just to be in tadasana, listening to and regulating my breathing while centering my core.  Today, given my level of pain and fatigue, I will only do a modified Surya Namaskara or Sun Salutation–slowly.

—-

 

So, Why Yoga? And How Does FMS Fit into All of This?  

As I’ve mentioned in an earlier post, yoga is extremely useful for people who suffer from chronic illnesses, which would include fibromyalgia.

Just search online for yoga and fibromyalgia and you will see the many sites that have dedicated a page or two to discuss the benefits of yoga.  One of the first is a 2010 article by WebMD that discusses a study done on yoga and women with fibromyalgia.  Here is an excerpt:

Women with fibromyalgia can reduce symptoms of the disease and improve their function by practicing the mind-body techniques of yoga, a new study says.

Researchers in Oregon who enrolled 53 women aged 21 or older for the study say that women who participated in a “Yoga of Awareness” health program showed significantly greater improvement infibromyalgia symptoms

Women in the “Yoga of Awareness” class participated for eight weeks in a program of instruction and exercise.

Classes included 40 minutes of gentle stretching poses, 25 minutes of meditation, 10 minutes of breathing techniques, 20 minutes of teaching presentations on using yoga principles for coping, and 25 minutes of group discussions, in which participants talked about practicing yoga in their homes.

So, What Can You Do?

Well, I always believe in meeting yourself where you are.

  • Locate and Assess your level of pain.  What and how much you can do depends upon your understanding of where and how severe your pain is.
  • Ask yourself lots of  questions, like “Can I  leave the house? Can I get out of bed?”
  • Depending on your answer, use the yoga resource that is most beneficial to you.  If you can go to a recommended class, then go.  If you cannot, YouTube and Amazon.com could serve as potential resources–of course, use your own judgement to decide what practice is safest for you to do.    

 

Below is an example of a resource that may be useful for you if you are experiencing low mobility, i.e. getting out of bed is not an option.  It is the Yoga in Bed Morning Stretch Series; there are 6 videos durations ranging between 6-11 minutes.

Good luck!

—-

ATR Challenge Update: Days 12 & 13

Wow, it continues! 🙂  Yesterday, I was unable to do much of anything, but I think I have already made up for it today.

So, What is right in my life?

Increasing Self-Love |Improving Self-Efficacy | Believing in Self-Worth

Connecting with the New| Reconnecting with the Old | Externalizing Love

Extending Help | Breathing Sunshine | Sleeping to Rain

Watching Cartoons | Laughing with my Child-Self | Laughing with my Pain

Laughing with my Hope | Laughing with my Sincerity | Laughing with my Life

Discovering Happiness | Enjoying Happiness | Accepting Sadness

Comforting Anger | Welcoming Mindfulness | Welcoming Internal Peace

Welcoming solitude | Welcoming togetherness | Welcoming Simplicity in

Everyone | Everything.

—-

In essence, it’s all good, because I believe and know it is–even if I’m stuck in bed. 😉

Until Next Time,

D.

Many, Many Thanks to My New Followers!

It’s one of those hazy Roman September mornings: the kind that isn’t so hot that you feel like your only option is to remain indoors, fixed permanently in your bed or under your shower.  Still, it is the kind that makes you a bit lazy about getting up or even bothering with finding mental clarity.

Rome, on these kinds of days, becomes a centrifugal blend of noises: the distinct songs of cicadas, the cobblestone scraping of straw brooms, the random knock of a hammer, the friendly greetings of neighbours, the midday ring of the church bells and the frustrated blares of traffic.  It’s that kind of morning.

Leaves stand still, birds have gone incognito, laundry dries on clotheslines, and there isn’t a soul in sight–even if voices can be heard in between the sadness of moving sirens.

I’ve woken–sort of–to this kind of day: depleted of energy and bogged down in thoughts.

Go through the routine: meditate, stretch (on bed, too tired to stand), effectively putz around room and find: necessary papers, missing perfume bottle, a collection of hairpins, and worn out fortunes from the local Japanese/Chinese restaurant that has yet to reopen since the start of summer and is “Chiuso per Ferie,” feel pleased that the room has been swept, books have been stacked, and mind has woken just a bit more.

I take a look at my computer: glance at Facebook, post something personal and then professional; think about email and decide to avoid it for now; visit school/work blog and then personal, and find myself at this moment of…

Gratitude.

Thank you to my new followers for taking a chance on supporting my blog.  Thank you to my old followers for your continued support.  Thank you to my visitors for acknowledging my presence.

All of you have made this hazy day much less hazy–

You let me know that I continue to take the right steps on my path.

Until Next Time,

D.

P.S.

Interested in the Gratitude Journal in the image above?

Visit Rosetta Thurman’s Happy Black Woman for more details.

P.P.S.

ATR Challenge Day 10: Getting up & Getting Grateful! Thanks! 😀

 

FMS | Was it Chickenpox? ( Article: Is Herpes Virus Connected to Fibromyalgia?)

Image found: http://krnb.com/

Seriously, now.

Another balmy Saturday. Me? Glued to computer screen with fingers on auto-type while my mind wonders about what fruit will be available in the rapidly depleting fruit section of my local supermarket.

In between finger taps, the consistent yappage of my neighbour’s invisible dog, and my acknowledgements that the world isn’t so bad after all, a random thought comes to mind. Well, not really a thought, but a memory; one that I thought was pretty useless…until now [cue dramatic suspense music here].

Picture it, me at 16 and in my last semester of high school…confined to my bed because of the chickenpox.

Yes, I know.  Chickenpox is something you get as a kid, not as a teenager when everything is all about image–actually, I didn’t really care, but still–and the sight of a pimple can send even the most popular of cheerleaders into a moment of panic.

But that was soooo long ago.

It’s one of many memories I shoved far into the black hole of my mind, so much so that even when I see the resulting scars on my face, I don’t register them as having anything to do with chickenpox.  It’s my defense mechanism checkmate, especially because I am into denial and apparently amazingly good at suppression.

Let’s get back to this moment though, where I am sitting on my bed and typing this post that I’d like to be less than 300 words.

For whatever reason, the words chickenpox and fibromyalgia flashed across my mind and thus my auto-typing fingers tapped them right into Google search and hit the Enter button.

The result?

Well, it seems that a lot of people have been wondering about the relationship between chickenpox and fibromyalgia, although there doesn’t seem to be a great deal of research about it.

Still, it might help to check out the links below to understand why some are wondering:

Is Herpes Virus Connected to Fibromyalgia?

Virus Related to Fibromyalgia?

FMS | ATR Challenge: Day 4

Is it Day 4 already???!! 

Four days may not seem like much to celebrate, but given my goal of sticktoitiveness, I am super glad that I have stuck to it, i.e. both the meditation/prayer challenge (Day 26) and the Acknowledge the Right Challenge (Day 4).

The happiness is also because, as a person with fibromyalgia, I find myself often in a position where I have to give up the things that I want to do or am doing.  So, any progress made, however small, in showing myself that I can do/have it must be acknowledged.

As to what was right yesterday? Well, many things:

  • I got up (despite the weather, aches and pains, and general lack of sleep)
  • I did my daily meditation/prayer and stretches
  • I went to class and met new people, and feel very upbeat about the courses I am taking
  • I met a new friend and spent a good deal of time talking.
  • I got some reading/writing/work done
  • I spoke with my mother, which is always a good thing.

For today, I thought I would leave you with a link to a great Yoga International article on the benefits of yoga for people with fibromyalgia: “The Art of Surrender: Yoga & Fibromyalgia.”

Happy Wednesday!!

&

Remember that making progress on any path

means putting one foot in front of the other!

Until Next Time,

D.

 

 

FMS | Please, Tell Me What I Can Eat….

Seriously. 😉

If you are like me and have been diagnosed with fibromyalgia as well as other comorbid illnesses, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Reynaud’s syndrome, then your relationship with food might be a complex one–and that probably is an understatement.

Eating the wrong foods or food combinations can mean more inflammation, pain, digestive issues, insomnia, fatigue, hair loss and gain (facial), decreased libido, mood swings, etc. And who wants more of that?

Especially, if you have comorbid diagnoses, you may find that the food recommended for one illness, may be discouraged for another illness. Sometimes it feels like a lose-lose battle.

Still, we must not despair. There is always a path to healthier and active living, if we choose to seek it.

For me, I live be a golden rule when it comes to living in my body.  I think of my body like any vehicle that I would drive. It is my personal vehicle, and so this rule applies:

Food is the Fuel

Exercise is the Engine

As long as the combination of those two factors is balanced, then I feel at peace with my choices. Whereas exercise may be limited to what my body can do at any given time and may not be a daily experience (although I try to make it so), food is something that I ought to consume daily for basic functioning and overall well-being.

However, food, the fuel that our bodies need to sustain us, is one aspect of self-care that can create havoc, for people with fibromyalgia, in our otherwise solid treatment plans.

Over the last six years, I have undertaken the task of discovering what foods my body can tolerate.  Perhaps this task is a leftover from my days as a personal trainer/fitness instructor or maybe it’s just that I want to feel the best I can every day. Whatever the case, I have been experimenting with foods in order to find a FMS+ plan that is nutritionally sound and interesting.

Here is what I’ve discovered about my body:

Foods it Likes

(Tolerates…because I can’t really say that I, personally, enjoy all of these foods):

  • Leafy Greens – Bring on the lettuce, cabbage, endive, etc.  I cannot express to you how much I detest endive…but I live in Italy and am a bit lazy with food preparation, so endive is bound to be present in the bagged salads that I buy.  Oh well.
  • Water – Natural. Okay, this may seem a bit strange, but it is my reality.  My body loves water in its most natural state, not effervescent (fizzy). There is little else beyond water that my body can handle as a liquid. It’s simply not on.
  • Fruits – The crunchy kinds.  Any kind of fruit that has a crunch to it, my body seems to appreciate more than fruits that could be considered juicy (or very ripened).  So, that leaves me with pears, nectarines, apples, etc. HOWEVER, I have learned that I can only eat these in moderation or, at least, rotate them out. I can also eat bananas, mangoes, susine gialle (I don’t know the English name), and grapefruits, but even more infrequently.
  • Nuts & Dried Fruits – Don’t get too excited.  I can eat two things from this category fairly often, but still I understand that I need to keep them in moderate amounts: peanuts & dried cranberries. That’s it. Sometimes, I can have almonds, but not as often.
  • Eggs –  Although I am not a fan, I can eat them and do.  I, however, rotate them in my diet, because I am not partial to the taste.
  • Seafood – Yes, I can eat seafood BUT not all. My body, for whatever reason, cannot handle frequent consumption of  certain fish, such as salmon and tuna.  Shellfish, however, gets a green light.
  • Yoghurt – Notice, I didn’t write milk.  I can eat all yoghurt (as far as I know).  I feel best, however, when I eat Greek yoghurt, which I eat frequently and often in combination with my nuts and dried fruits–it’s my little treat.
  • Gelato – Not often, but I can eat gelato.  I don’t know about ice-cream. Also, I have to stick with plain flavours. Ideally, the gelato should be gluten-free (gluten is sometimes used as a thickener).  So, nothing with cereals or candies, etc.
  • Chocolate (dark or white) – Again, not often, but I can eat chocolate every now and again.  Like gelato, should be ideally gluten-free and it cannot contain any kind of cereals and is best without dried fruits (which is often raisins, which I cannot eat).
  • Diet Soda Ideally, caffeine-free. Looking to spice things up liquid-wise?  Well, I can have diet soda fairly regularly, BUT because of my IBS, I understand that I need to limit my consumption.
  • Other vegetables – Mushrooms, olives, cucumbers, zucchini, garlic, onion, leeks, chives, scallions.  All of those get the green light.
  • Oils & other fats – I cook with olive oil. Period.  I do have butter in my refrigerator, but use it infrequently.
  • Seasonings – Well, most, as far as I know.  I tend not to season my foods, except with curry, black pepper, powdered/liquid garlic, rosemary, thyme or pimento.  And even these are used sparingly.
  • Gluten-free Products – WAIT…Please, don’t get excited, I can eat gluten-free cookies/biscuits…but not all, and it’s sort of a game of roulette.  I never know how my body will react to things.  Also, even though I have been able to eat these things, doesn’t mean that I think that it is good for me.  So, only when I am having a particular craving will I make the effort to purchase these.  They can also be great for making the crust of a low-carb/gluten-free cheesecake.
  • Cheeses – Apparently, I can whatever cheeses are available, but in severe moderation. 🙂 I am partial to softer cheeses, such as brie or cream cheese (which I use to make my low-carb/gluten-free cheesecake).
  • Fake Sugars – Yes, I can use them and do to add flavour to my cooking or sometimes to my water.  Fake sugars, however, are tricky and it is important to understand which ones work for you and which don’t.  My body, for example, cannot tolerate sugar alcohols in any form, whether as a sweetener or in the presence of a food (including gum and mint).

Okay, so those are the major (if not complete list of) items that I can eat.

—–

What I Choose Not To Eat…

The list of items that I ought not to eat is very long.  Notice that I write ought not to eat.

This is because I can eat them, but there will be repercussions.  As long as I am willing to accept the repercussions (major IBS symptoms, random/sudden weight gain, increased pain and fatigue, migraines, increased insomnia), then I’m good to go. 😉

So, what I do I choose not to eat?  Well, I’ll give you general categories:

I discovered how bad it was for me just the other day.  Recently, I bought a bag of gluten-free flour, thinking that I would make myself some awesome Jamaican boiled dumplings. Well…the experience left me in misery.  Sure the dumplings tasted good, but I felt almost as awful as I would have if I were to have used regular flour.  Why?

Well, the foundation of most gluten-free flour is grounded rice, potato starch, sugar, and even some finely grounded nuts, such as almonds.  Remember my list of foods that my body likes?  Well, there you go.  Of course, having spent close to 4 Euros on this bag of flour, I intend to use it all, but sparingly (it’s good until next year).

  • Nightshade vegetables & fruits As much as I love them.  I have said goodbye to tomatoes, bell peppers, potatoes, eggplant (mostly), peppers, and most berries (cranberry exception).  They cause/increase inflammation and possibly insomnia, so it’s just not on.
  • Citrus Fruits – High sugar content, acidic, and too much vitamin C.  Well, all of these things I can do without. I already take a daily supplement of vitamin C, so I can live without them. Of course, as mentioned above, every now and again, I can eat a grapefruit. 🙂
  • Caffeine-heavy products – So, that basically wipes out tea, coffee, sodas, and even chocolate. 🙂  Of course, anything can be consumed in moderate amounts.  Still, I do not drink coffee, and rarely tea or soda. Of course, I mentioned chocolate before.
  • Meats – Like grains. It’s simply not on.
  • Milk – I always find it strange that I can eat yoghurt, but not drink milk. Well, that’s the reality. I can, however, use heavy cream for cooking.
  • Nuts & dried fruits – Too much sugar, too challenging for the body to process. 
  • Alcohol – I’ve never been partial to drinking alcohol. That being stated, alcohol simply presents a challenge for many with FMS. Want to feel more tired? More nauseous? Less restful sleep? Then, drink alcohol. I’m good without it though.

—-

Other things of consumption to think about?

Well, if you smoke, STOP. Smoking increases pain severity.

Chewing gum? Pause. Check the sugar content. Your sugar intake may be having an adverse impact on your health.

Of course, the research on what foods actually help or hinder us is limited.  Each person is different. So, each of us must take responsibility for what we put into our bodies.  Don’t just read this blog or something else and say “Aha! Now I know what to eat!”

Don’t be lazy!

Instead, take this information and use it for your own research. As I mentioned before, it has taken me 6 years to sort this out for myself AND it is still an ongoing process, especially as my body grows older (as a woman, this presents certain nutritional and hormonal issues).

What I’ve come to understand is that, no matter what, I must love my body.

It’s become a mantra…

I must love my body, even when it isn’t doing what I want it to do, even when it isn’t looking the way I want it to look, even when it feels like a stranger to me.  I must love and care for it the best way that I can.

I must shut out the emotional voice of my body that sometimes longs for foods that are unwise for me to eat, and listen carefully to the wise voice of my body that reveals to me the foods that will help me heal and maintain balance.

Food is fuel for our bodies, not a crutch for our self-esteems.

The Take-Away?  Well, I try to follow two basic rules when shopping, especially when I am thinking to buy something new:

  • If the food can live on a shelf longer than one to two weeks, then I don’t buy it.
  • If the food is in a can, bottle, plastic package, then I hestitate to buy it and refer to the first rule.

 

Well, I’m off to the grocery store! Happy Sunday!

P.S. If weight is an issue for you and you are looking for a place to begin, or you are needing inspiration on your journey, then check out fitness motivation speaker and certified women’s fitness, weightloss, and nutrition trainer Erika Nicole Kendall‘s blog:  A Black Girl’s Guide To Weightloss.  Kendall’s blog covers a variety of topics, including fitness, body image, sex, culture, food recipes, and beauty.

FMS | Article: Aerobic Exercise ‘Most Effective Weapon’ for Fibromyalgia

It’s a bright sunny morning here in Rome and, thankfully, not too terribly hot.  Over the last month, I’ve been engaging in a renewed program of incorporating daily walks as a part of my self-care management.

Now, I don’t mean just taking a walk down the road to the neighbourhood grocery store.  I mean taking a proper walk of between 1-3 hours (dependent upon weather and time).

Back in 2008 when I was finally diagnosed with fibromyalgia, my body was in its most unhealthy state.  I had gained a tremendous amount of weight as I could barely get up due to my fatigue and the pain was unbearable. I simply didn’t see how I could get my body to move and to go about life as usual.  Not only that, the drastic changes in both my weight and overall health had been devastating to my self-concept and self-esteem.

You see, just prior to beginning my journey to becoming a therapist, I worked as a personal trainer and fitness instructor.  I prided myself on my level of strength and stamina.  I prided myself on my little need for sleep (of course, I was in my twenties) and was content with the way my body functioned.

Enter fibromyalgia…and the pictured changed.  I was in misery.  It took me almost a year after my diagnosis (2009) to figure out a strategy to get my body and life back together.

I didn’t want to be a walking pharmacy anymore, dragging around a heavy frame that was only becoming heavier and making my symptoms worse.

I decided that I would walk…even if it was the last thing I wanted to do.  I knew that I would be in misery if I attempted to join an exercise program and I don’t believe in dieting.

Most importantly, I knew that walking was still something I could do. It hadn’t been taken away from me.

I started out with small goals, solicited some friends to join me, and began a 10 minute walk program.  That’s right.  Ten whole minutes.  Early in the morning, a couple of times per week, we would meet up and walk together for 10 whole minutes.  Eventually, we increased the time and frequency, and even (gasp) began a jog/walk program. 😉

Fast-forward five years and here I am, walking for hours.  My body has benefited tremendously from the small decision I made back in 2009.  The simple decision to walk. I take one medication for my illness as opposed to several that I had been taking back in 2008.

You see, we can spend our time trying to find the right medication(s). We can go from doctor to doctor.  We can bemoan our circumstances and ask ‘why me?’ forever or, at least, until our last breath.  None of that really will change anything in the end if we don’t look at how we can take control over our bodies ourselves and lives.

Don’t just leave it up to the latest pill you can pop.  Don’t just give up and say ‘what’s done is done’.  Don’t just decide that you are unlucky or fated to living your life in a way that is displeasing to you.

Decide that you can change it. Decide that you can control it.  It’s your body and your illness.  Decide how you want to live with it…happily.

There is always a path to be found…

Until Next Time,

D. 

Click on the link below for the article!

Aerobic Exercise ‘Most Effective Weapon’ for Fibromyalgia (Excerpt below)

“There is no magic drug against fibromyalgia and, in my opinion, there will never be. Psychotherapists don’t work miracles, but psychotherapy can help and, in a few cases, turn people with fibromyalgia into nonpatients. Drugs may help, but patients don’t like them,” said investigator Winfried Häuser, MD, from Technische Universität München in Germany, who has published widely on fibromyalgia.

“Aerobic exercise is the most effective weapon we have; healthy people profit from continuous physical exercise, and so do patients with fibromyalgia,” he explained.

Dr. Häuser presented an overview of research on fibromyalgia treatment here at the European League Against Rheumatism Congress 2014.